Posts Tagged ‘Kansas City Royals’

The Baseball Show with No Name will air at 7:00 PM with me & @JoelHenard & guests @Brandon_Warne @FigureFilbert

The Baseball Show with No Name will air at 7:00 PM with me & Joel Henard & guests Brandon Warne and Jonathan Mitchell: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thefantasyinsiders/2012/05/07/baseball-daily-digest-radio-with-joel-henard-and-albert-lang.

We’ll talk Mariano Rivera, Baltimore Orioles, Washington Nationals, Jason Heyward, Albert Pujols, Bryce Harper, Hanley Ramirez, Heath Bell, Tampa Bay Rays, Jemile Weeks, Justin Morneau, Joe Mauer, Robin Ventura, Adam Dunn, Kansas City Royals, Francisco Liriano, Alcides Escobar, Brett Lawrie, Kyle Seager, Adam Lind, Huroki Kuroda, Felix Hernandez, roto, fantasy baseball and much more.

Bottom of the Ninth: What to Look for in the First Week for Closers for @Razzball

Bottom of the Ninth: What to Look for in the First Week for Closers for Razzball: http://razzball.com/bottom-of-the-ninth-what-to-look-for-in-the-first-week/.

A look at the bullpen situations of the Chicago White Sox, Boston Red Sox, Tampa Bay Rays, Baltimore Orioles, Kansas City Royals, Oakland Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Washington Nationals.

Salvador Perez, 2012 Fantasy Sleeper for Razzball

Salvador Perez, 2012 Fantasy Sleeper for Razzball: http://razzball.com/salvador-perez-2012-fantasy-sleeper/

h2h Corner ~ Check You Out on the Flip Side: Ruppert Jones

I’m pretty sure I picked this card out of the thousands I go through because I thought Ruppert was misspelled (it isn’t) and the name makes me chuckle. It probably makes me chuckle because of Family Guy, but, in my head, Ruppert is really Higgins from Magnum PI – the mind does funny things.

I figure I also liked the rather mundane factoid as well. He enjoys both karate and racquetball (presumably not at the same time). I don’t really like either. Karate wasn’t my thing and I’m not a fan of Martial Arts movies (unless it is Mortal Kombat or stars JCVD). Racquetball I enjoyed a little, but it reminds me of old fogies with short shorts and smelly socks. I also hate squash (the game, not the food, acorn squash soup is delicious).

Anyway, the reflexes and agility required by both enjoyed activities must have helped Jones during his career. In 1977, he made 465 putouts, the 27th most in a season ever. In a game on May 16, 1978, Jones recorded 12 putouts, thereby tying the major league record for putouts by an outfielder in an extra-inning game. He batted fourth in the contest, went 1/6 with two Ks and his average stood at .213. Former flip-sider Shane Rawley took the loss.

The following year, 1979, Jones recorded 453 putouts, the 44th most ever in a season. The man could track down balls (even though his defensive abilities seem suspect – 2.2 dWAR for his career).

Even before all that, Jones was the first pick in the 1976 expansion draft by the Seattle Mariners, after being selected in the third round of the amateur draft by the Royals in 1973.

His 1977 season made the Mariners look like geniuses. He went .263/.324/.454 with 24 bombs – he was worth 3.3 wins above a replacement player.

However things wouldn’t progress. Aside from his record setting put-out game in ‘78, his season was a disaster. But he bounced back and played well for the Mariners in ’79, finishing his career there worth 6 WAR.

He’d spend one year with the Yankees and then three with the San Diego Padres. He played his best ball for the Padres (7.5 WAR), but they granted him free agency after the 1983 season. He signed with the Detroit Tigers.

He appeared in just two games for the Tigers in the postseason that year, didn’t contribute much, but was part of a win in the World Series against the Padres.

The majority of his post-season experience came the year before this card was printed. He went 3/17, but walked 5 times for the Angels against the Boston Red Sox. And that would wrap his last real season in the majors.

He came back in 1987 but couldn’t buy a base hit. He played another year in Japan before hanging it up and focusing on Karacquete, a new sport that never quite caught on.

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Don’t Look Back in Anger: Brett Cecil, Felipe Paulino, Edwin Encarnacion

Don’t Look Back in Anger: Brett Cecil, Felipe Paulino, Edwin Encarnacion For Razzball:

http://razzball.com/don%E2%80%99t-look-back-in-anger-brett-cecil-felipe-paulino-edwin-encarnacion/

 

Don’t Look Back In Anger: Luke Hochevar, Mike Carp, Brandon McCarthy

For Razzball: Don’t Look Back In Anger: Luke Hochevar, Mike Carp, Brandon McCarthy

http://razzball.com/dont-look-back-in-anger-luke-hochevar-mike-carp-brandon-mccarthy/

On Razzball: Don’t Look Back In Anger: Alex Gordon

Don’t Look Back In Anger: Alex Gordon on Razzball!

h2h Corner ~ Check You Out On the Flip Side: Neifi Perez

poerez backperesfrontAmidst all the recent Yuniesky Betancourt confusion, I stumbled upon this Neifi Perez card from 2002. I’m also in a surly mood because the holidays are over and I’m tired, so I wanted to go on a rantpage.

I assume Buddy Bell did not actually mean what he said, he was simply trying to be a company man, nice guy and player’s coach, but still, to ask if there is a better shortstop than Neifi Perez is like asking if there is a better looking man/woman than Fergie.

In his 668 games with the Rockies, Perez managed a .282/.313/.411 line. Not good, not abysmal for a shortstop, but, still, not good. He struck out 287 times in 2,728 ABs and hit just 43 HRs. He stole 33 bases, but was caught 24 times. In short he was worth just 1.1 wins above a replacement player. For someone who played most of his games at Coors field those offensive numbers are truly offensive.

So what gave Perez an edge? Well, he had a reputation of being a good glove man and did win the gold glove in 2000 (although ask Rafael Palmeiro how prestigious the award is). He also is tied for the sixth best fielding percentage among shortstops all time. When he hung up his glove, he finished with a .978 fielding mark, the same as Ozzie Smith, Orlando Cabrera and Devi Cruz. He was just behind the immortal Cal Ripken, Tony Fernandez, Larry Bowa, Mike Bordick and Omar Vizquel.

Unfortunately, his time in Colorado would represent the high watermark of his career, as he’d spend the next seven seasons whittling down his career WAR to 0.1. For the Royals, who traded for him, he’d be worth -1.9 WAR. This began a sad collection of trades involving Perez.

However, the Rockies did outstanding to get Jermaine Dye who was just 27 at the time and was putting up a .272/.333/.417 line. Not great for a corner outfielder but he was worth 10.6 WAR up to that point and had a career .285/.341/.481 line. That is where the Rockies’ (the team that gave Perez all those ABs) intelligence ended. The same day they would flip Dye to the Oakland Athletics for Todd Belitz, Mario Encarnacion and Jose Ortiz.

For Oakland, Dye was worth 2.5 WAR and put up a .252/.326/.444 line – certainly better than Neifi Perez.

Back to Perez who the Royals gave too much playing time and lost too many wins because of. Mercifully, he’d be in Kansas City for just two years before going to the San Francisco Giants (worth 0.3 during his time there) and then three years for the Cubs (1.6 WAR). Draw your own conclusions why…or think about Edgar Renteria’s recent contract.

To sum up the first Betancourt, in only five seasons in his 12-year career did Perez post an OBP above .300. Only once was it over .314.

Basically, July 25, 2001 must have been a shot to the ego for Jermaine Dye (perhaps moreso than the free agent market in 2010). I mean, he was traded for what?

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h2h Corner ~ Check You Out On the Flip Side: Mark Gubicza 2.0

gubiczabackThe more I read about Mark Gubicza, the more I like him/his career. And he became the first two time Flip Sider (first appearance: here).

In this Donruss Triple Play card, we learn about another hobby of Gubicza’s (if you remember, his hobby in 1986 was “being music”). While I was confused by the phraseology in the past card, I wholeheartedly support players who approach the game like a fan (see also: Richard, Chris).

It is super cool to me that, even though Gubicza had played nine season in the majors at this point, he collects sports memorabilia and autographed baseball cards. I imagine he was able to get some really cool autos — maybe even a few George Brett’s?

Anyway, my second look at Gubicza has me investigating his career a bit more. The two-time All-star led AL pitchers in WAR in 1988. That year, he won 20 games with a 2.70 ERA and 1.19 WHIP. He added 183 Ks and a 2.20 K:BB rate. Unfortunately, he’d get little Cy Young recognition, finishing behind Frank Viola and Dennis Eckersley in voting. The next year he’d lead the league in starts (36) and do it again in 1995 (with 33 starts).

gubiczabackfront

Given his durability, it isn’t surprising that he owns a few dubious Royals records, most notably: walks allowed (783) and hit batsmen (58). But you gotta be good to be able to hit that many guys. Let’s hope he parted amicably with the guys he hit and maybe even got their John Hancock on a baseball card.

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For the history of this series, check out this article: Check You Out On the Flip Side: Howard Johnson.

h2h Corner ~ Check You Out On the Flip Side: Mark Gubicza

Mark gubicza back Mark gubiczaThis card cracks me up. It’d be one thing if it was printed in the 1960s, you know with flower power, psychedelics, LSD and whatnot, but for a pitcher to list his hobby as “being music” in the 1980s is bizarre. The 80s were full of excess and cocaine, not good vibrations – or at least that’s what I learned from American Psycho.

To elaborate on my point: what do you think Mark did when he went to a church picnic?

Parishioner: so Mark, when you aren’t pitching what do you like to do?
Mark: I like to be music.
Parishioner: You mean listen to music?
Mark: No, I mean be music.

Quickly it sounds like someone is on drugs or a character in a Haruki Murakami novel.

In reality, Gubicza was a very underrated pitcher in the 1980s. He was a second round pick in 1981, got to the majors in 1984 as a 21-year-old and posted a 4.05 ERA and 1.31 WHIP. He would pitch 269 innings in 1988 and go 20-8 with a 2.70 ERA. He would post a 7.1 and 7.2 WAR in 1988 and 1989, respectively.

His father also pitched professionally, logging 285 innings in the minors, but would never reach the majors.

Follow h2h Corner on Twitter (http://twitter.com/h2h_Corner)

For the history of this series, check out this article: Check You Out On the Flip Side: Howard Johnson.

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