Posts Tagged ‘liriano’

h2h Corner ~ Katy Perry (Hot ‘N’ Cold Fantasy Baseball) All-Stars

I haven’t been writing as much lately. I’m not sure why. It could be that most of my columns require a few weeks of data to really be useful. It could be because I got most of my player profiles done by mid-March so I could be ready for everyone’s drafts. That left me with little to write about. Who knew that anti-procrastination would lead to a general malaise?

I’ve also moved away from covering much fantasy news…as it happens. There are great writers whose job that is and I don’t think I’d add much value.

I also got a puppy and am tired a lot more.

I’m also writing a ton for my day job—an amazing amount of content that leaves me a little drained…creatively.

I’m also struggling with my future in the “business” – not sure I can call it a business if I don’t get paid. But I love the weekly radio show I do. I like the writing when I do it – it’s just gotten harder to get myself started.

What makes it easier? Readers. I get questions all day long on twitter and I love answering them. I get alerts on my phone every time I get a question and I try to answer within minutes. I truly appreciate everyone who thinks my opinion matters and I hope I’ve steered people the right way.

This sounds like an “I’m quitting” letter doesn’t it?

Well, it ain’t. Just an apology for my lack of vigor and vitality. Let’s just say I’ve been a little cold.

Now, I’m ready to get a little hot (and, as I hit that period, Best of You came on).

Players get hot and cold over a seven-day period, it’s as sure as the samples are small.

That is why Katy created the Hot ‘N’ Cold All-stars.

Cause you’re hot…you’re yes…you’re in…you’re up

Johnny Damon – Since Manny exited stage right, Damon has been on fire. Deciding to enter the Hall as a Kansas City Royal has apparently inspired the man to the tune of a .333 average, two HRs, nine RBIs and two SBs over the last seven days. Damon, @JoelHenard’s favorite player, could be a nice option for a little power and a little steals. It looks like the Rays might have to run a lot given Longoria is out and they have no right-handed hitting power in the line-up. Damon has some upside as a 4th/5th outfielder.

Jonathan Herrera – Herrera was a mainstay of my NL-only team last year. Yet, he’s making a play for mixed leagues in 2011? Well his last seven days were the ninth best in fantasy owing to his ridiculous .478 average and four steals. As a 21-year-old, he stole 34 bases in A+ ball in 2006, but his SB number has not reached those heights since. Still, he hit .277 in 960 AAA plate appearances and .280 in 3,139 minor league plate appearances. Could he be Placido Polanco with a few more steals? Absolutely. However, there is a real worry about playing time given the crowded Rockies infield. If someone like Polanco is useful in your league, Herrera makes a decent grab, but I’m not going after him in anything but the deepest mixed leagues – maybe if he was SS eligible (but I don’t see that happening for some reason).

David Freese – I thought he could bring a nice reward for his draft day price tag, and so far, so (sort of) good. Over the last week, Freese went 11/22 with two homers. I’ll stand by my 15-20 HR projection with a .290+ batting average. Not a bad corner.

Wilson Betemit – According to the Elias Sports Bureau (not really), Betemit has now been on the Katy Perry All-stars more times than anyone else. Over the last seven days, he went 10/21 with a homer and a steal. With Aviles and Kila scuffling a tad, Betemit is seeing more and more playing time. I also picked him up as a spot start on Thursday and enjoyed a round tripper. I’m finding it hard to drop him for middle relief help – odd. Could the #8 prospect-rated prospect before the 2002 season be hitting his stride at age 29? Sort of. I wouldn’t be shocked if we saw a .260 average with 15-20 HRs, with some upside. Of course, with Mike Moustakas waiting in the wings, who knows how many ABs Betemit will get. For now, though, he makes a decent bench guy in deeper leagues.

Jeff Baker – I always thought the Cheaper by the Dozen father was weird (I was confused by him trying to shave with both hands)– that said, I’m incredibly anal about maximizing my time…stringing together actions in a coherent fashion. If I need to go to the bathroom, I’ll chug my drink so that I can refill it on the way. Jeff Baker maximizes his at bats. He was 7/16 last week with a home run. Baker, an NL-only delight, won’t get enough playing time really, as he’ll only hit against lefties. But, man, does he hit southpaws: .316/.368/.556. He also qualifies at middle and corner. He should be owned in every NL-only league.

Chris Coghlan – Maybe it’s wishful thinking since I just traded for him (in a move that saw me part with Jose Tabata), but I see a glimmer of hope for Coghlan. Off to a horrendous start, he righted the marlin over the last seven days (9/26 and a homer). Still, it would be nice to see some stolen bases. I’m thinking he can hit in the .280-.295 range with 10 HRs and 15 SBs.

Jamey Carroll – The main beneficiary of Rafael Furcal’s injury were NL-only owners everywhere that had Carroll and his insane position eligibility on their benches. He qualifies everywhere but first and catcher. Stepping in quickly for Furcal, Carroll went 11/28 with two stolen bases. He can be a .300 hitter with a handful of SBs, perhaps a Swiss Army Adam Kennedy? That’ll play a lot of places.

Marlon Byrd – Say whatever you will about the contract, but Byrd is not a bad player. It was pretty clear to most people that his 20 HR bender in 2009 was more the aberration than a trend. So, Byrd is a low double digit masher. Still, he comes with a .280-.300 average and 70-85 runs/RBIs. Over the last week, he hit .400, scored five runs and knocked in three. It isn’t great, but those numbers aren’t sitting out there in many leagues. I like him in most 12-teamers.

Russell Branyan – As someone who talked a lot about Juan Miranda and Brandon Allen, it pains me to put Branyan here. Over the last seven days, he is 6/14 with a HR. He is outhitting Miranda by a large margin and is clearly the better batsman. I imagine the Diamondbacks will realize this and give Branyan more and more at bats. I’d scoop up the power now. I really believe the club should showcase him for a trade, then let Miranda hit, or at least try to later in the season.

Bruce Chen – Seven days, two starts, two wins, no runs, eight Ks and a 0.79 WHIP. That’s hella good. The one-time Oriole ace is not the worst pitcher in the world (of course he is nowhere near the best). In addition, he might never have another week like he did over his last two starts. Still, we could see a low-4.00 ERA and a K/9 above six. I don’t think there is much separating him from Mark Buehrle.

Randy Wolf – Let it be known that, for some reason, maybe because at one point I liked the Phillies, I have always been a Randy Wolf fan/owner. His ability and frustration doesn’t get anymore telling than his last seven-day two-start stretch (12.2 IPs, one win, 15 Ks, a 1.42 ERA and 1.18 WHIP). He didn’t pitch all that good against the Cubs coming off a horrible first start at Cincinnati, but then he owned the Pittsburgh Pirates. I think Wolf is a guy you throw out there for Ks and be somewhat comfortable against poor hitting teams. Maybe a Justin Masterson with little upside? Still, at the end of the day, you’ll get 7-7.5 Ks for every nine innings.

Phil Coke – The new Coke is better than the old Coke? Over the last seven days, Coke threw 13.2 IPs, got a win, struck out nine and had a 0.88 WHIP. Those were his first two starts of the year. He has pitched 16 innings this year, 25% as much as last year (which was the most he ever threw in a season). As a spot starter in a bind, Coke might be your guy, but I wouldn’t come close to relying on him, given his utter lack of a track record as a major league starter. He also doesn’t have quite the pedigree that a CJ Wilson had going into last season.

Phil Humber – Maybe this is my apology to Vladimir Nabokov for not loving Lolita (maybe I didn’t love it because I watched the Kubrick flick first?). Anyway, Humber catches my eye. He had one start over the last week. In it, he went six innings for the victory and got four Ks. He was a first round pick by the Mets and an integral part of the Johan Santana trade. At one time, a top 50 prospect, Humber has never really been healthy and has pitched only 59.1 major league innings. If you’re in a deep league where every starter is owned, Humber is somewhat attractive. The White Sox have done wonders with some way post-hype hurlers, so I’d keep a watchful eye on what Humber does.

Then you’re cold…then you’re no…then you’re out…then you’re down

Neil Walker – As hot as he started, he’s been Mr. Freeze Cold over the last seven days (3/19). Walker was never as good as he was in the first week and is not this bad. In reality, he is actually exactly what his numbers look like at the moment: .271/.330/.480. He could get to 20 HRs, although will more likely settle into the 15-17 range.

Andrew McCutchen – More Pirates and a player I’m relying on in a lot of places. McCutchen has been more Daniel than Andrew this year. He was 2/19 over the last seven days and has only attempted two steals this season. Still, he hasn’t been striking out (just 10% K rate) and has been walking more than normal. He has a horrendous BABip (.200) and a poor line drive rate. Right now, there isn’t any real concern. He should get his OBP back into the .360s which would increase his stolen bases. I’m not worried.

Dan Uggla – Another guy I am relying on who has been terrible. Over the last seven days, Uggla has gone 2/23. On the bright side, half of his hits are homers! While he isn’t striking out as much as normal, he isn’t walking at all. Still, if you thought McCutchen’s BABip was offensive, Uggla’s .128 mark should make you vomit. Sure, his line drives are way down and he is hitting a lot more fly balls without posting his usual HR/FB rate, but it’s early. If he weren’t making contact, I’d be a bit more concerned. It will be important to see if he continues to trade line drives for fly balls though, because that could drain his average.

Pedro Alvarez – I have a feeling young Pedro* will make a lot of Katy Perry All-stars in his career. His last week wasn’t great: 1/16 with eight Ks. On the year his massive K rate (34.8%) is just 0.5% higher than last season. He does have a lower BABip in 2011 (.300) than in 2010 (.341) which is partially driving his sub-Mendoza line average. Still, the swings and misses aren’t to blame. What’s odd is that his line drive percentage is up (of course small sample size) and fly ball percentage down (of course he’s hit an inordinate amount of pop ups). He is also seeing a lot less fast balls (about 12% less) and more sliders, curves and change-ups. Might the league be adjusting to him? Possibly. It could also be a real small sample of a few pitchers with different approaches. I’m not too concerned, he’s still hitting the ball hard, they just aren’t finding holes. I think he’s a rather attractive buy-low

*and what is the deal with the amount of pop culture Pedro references? I mean there is Varsity Blues and an entire electoral campaign. Well, I guess that’s it. But two seems like more than none.

Vernon Wells – I know that some people who write a “Hot ‘n Cold” column don’t believe on giving up on Wells, but I don’t see the point in looking at his past season performances when he is no longer playing in the Roger’s Centre. From last week: “Wells has hit better in Toronto than any other place. He has a .226/.267/.340 line in 173 plate appearances in Angel Stadium. With a lot of outfielders available, Wells just shouldn’t be owned as much as he is.” Over the last seven days, he was just 2/22. I’d much rather have Marlon Byrd.

Chone Figgins – I feel like shouting Figgins!!!! What a confusing fellow he has been. Over the last seven days, he is 4/17 and has battled a thumb problem. On the year, he has one SB and that was in the first game of the season. His walk-rate (which ensures SB opportunities) is just 4.4%. He hasn’t been striking and does have a miserable BABip (.167). While he has been hitting more fly balls (43% this year compared to 34% for his career), his line drive rate hasn’t plummeted. I can’t see anything that points to Figgins continuing last year’s downward trend. I’ll stubbornly support him and give him more than 45 PAs to get his OBP up.

Mike Stanton – Much like Alvarez, Stanton should be a frequent Katy Perry nominee (it’s all the swings and misses which create a fan to blow hair back in photos). He received almost a full compliment of at bats (20) over the last seven says, but collected just four hits. He has just 27 at bats on the season, and, so far, has walked more and struck out less. So, really, there’s nothing to see here. I’m sure we’ll discuss him later.

Carlos Zambrano – It’s not often a two-win pitcher ends up on Katy’s Cold All-stars, but Big Z is one bad mother. Over the last seven days, he pitched 11.2 innings, struck out nine, but posted a messy 6.94 ERA and equally messy 1.71 WHIP. He wasn’t facing the Bronx Bombers either, as Houston and Milwaukee roughed him up. Basically, part of the blame goes to a bullpen that didn’t strand enough of Zambrano’s runners. The other part of the blame goes to a small (sample size) decline in his K-rate. That’s the key to watch. If it stays in the mid-6.00s, it will be time to move.

Ian Kennedy – There is no middle ground with Kennedy. Either he’s the next Whitey Ford or the next Kei Igawa. Eleven innings over the last seven days were vintage Igawa (8.18 ERA and 1.45 WHIP). But he did collect 10 punch-outs and a win. Basically, he just got hammered by the St. Louis Cardinals (nine runs in three innings), who have a few skilled batsmen. I am not at all concerned about him.

Wandy Rodriguez – My favorite pitcher that I’ve never seen pitch. Wandy was semi-atrocious last week: 12 innings, just six strike-outs and a 1.58 WHIP. What’s worse? Batters have a .417 average on balls in play against him and he has a craptastic 60.8% strand rate. He also has posted a 6.19 K/9 rate compared three straight seasons of 8.22+. Not surprisingly, he is giving up more hard hit balls (26% LD rate compared to about 20% for his career) and getting less swinging strikes (6.8% of the time compared to 8.8%+ over the last three seasons). Batters are making better and more contact against Wandy than previously. It’s a little disconcerting, but it’s only 16 innings. If you can use this argument to get him on the cheap, I’d go for it. But be sure to monitor his upcoming starts closely to see if he starts missing more bats.

Ted Lilly – Lilly and Dodger stadium were supposed to be a match made in heaven. Yet, his two starts over the last seven days yielded just 10.1 innings, five Ks and a putrid 5.23/1.55 ERA/WHIP (of course neither of his starts came at home). What’s scary is the bad starts came against offensive dynamos like the Giants and Padres. Lilly is just not missing any bats this year, but batters aren’t crushing his pitches that badly. I expect him to shake off the start and get back on track.

James Shields – People seem to be panicking about Shields for some reason. I guess his last seven days (13 innings, only four Ks and a 1.54 WHIP) were bad, but he’s not exactly Mr. Reliable. Also, I think this is the first time in his career that his ERA is outperforming his FIP and xFIP. Like Lilly and WandyRod, Shields ain’t missing any bats, but, unlike them, batters aren’t making great contact against him (18.8% LD rate). In fact, the only real changes in his batted ball rates are a big increase in his infield fly rates. Shields’ early season ERA can be explained by a low BABIP and high strand rate. If those normalize without increased K totals, he could be in for trouble. He did pitch well in his last start, so we’ll have to see what comes next. It’s always a bumpy road with Shields.

Francisco Liriano – I’d be remiss if Liriano didn’t make the squad. In 14.1 innings of work, he has three loses, a 9.42 ERA and 1.74 WHIP. Some of that can be explained away by some heinous bullpen support (he has a 47.4% strand rate). But he’s also missing a few less bats than he did last year and walking a ton of guys (5.65/9). Batters are making a lot more contact in the zone (64.1% of the time) than they normally do (50.7% for his career). However, they aren’t hitting the ball any harder really. I’m actually not that concerned about Liriano. Give me a few more starts and I think he’ll be fine.

All stats as of noon on April 15, 2011.

h2h_Corner on Twitter

h2h Corner ~ The Buddy Garrity, Don Draper, Ed Norton Sales Convention

Buddy Garrity sales time (sell now)

When it is Buddy Garrity sales time, you should be moving players immediately. These are players that will likely regress to means or not perform as well as they have been (i.e., sell high candidates). In addition, they include guys I don’t think will perform well at all during the rest of the season. These are players you are best cutting your losses with.

Vernon Wells – Wells is a dreamboat for Buddy; think a classic car that looks fantastic on the outside, yet is worn down under the hood. Wells is off to a fantastic start (seven HRs, a .333 AVE and .398 OBP); however, as you well know, he won’t keep up this pace. I see a line more like 80 runs, 20 HRs, 75 RBIs, a .270 AVE and a .330 OBP. If you can move him for more than that, do so.

Jose Guillen – Guillen seems to be the vintage Ashton Martin to Wells’ sparkling Corvette (I don’t know cars). However, Guillen has been more useful than Wells when healthy. That said, he can’t keep up a 50 HR pace. Buddy has Guillen out front with a bright new paint job, priced to move. If you can bring back a $10 consistent player for Guillen, I’d be happy with those returns.

Dan Uggla – I love Dan Uggla (he is a cheap 30 HR lock at second base). Unfortunately so does Buddy. You know why? Uggla is a career .259 hitter, yet is hitting at a .298 pace so far this season. The HRs, runs and RBIs will be there, but he hasn’t suddenly become a .290 hitter. Sell people on him being in a “contract year,” but don’t give him away. Right now he is playing like a fourth round talent, when he is really only a sixth/seventh rounder.

Barry Zito – Thanks to a .203 BAbip, Zito has basically halved his hit/9 rate (8.0 for career, 4.9 for 2010). That is pretty unsustainable. He certainly isn’t as worthless as he was a few years ago, but there is a lot of hype around him being similar to what he was when he pitched for the As. In reality, he’s strung together a bit of luck with the best K/BB rate of his career. I’d be pricing him to move immediately.

Brad Penny – I own Brad Penny everywhere and who wouldn’t be happy with the returns? Well, for starters, he hasn’t struck anyone out (4.7 Ks/9), which really hurts you in innings capped leagues. Further, he has magically begun walking less than one batter per game, when, for his entire career, he walked nearly three batters per nine innings. I don’t think Penny will fall off a cliff, but I’d rather have a guy who could strike a few batters out. I do think his ratios will climb a bit: at least a 3.00 ERA and 1.20 WHIP. I’d rather trade away a hot pitcher at the beginning of the year then bank on him continuing to perform optimally.

Don Draper sales time (moderately/slyly begin to move)

The Don Draper sales time requires that you be a less obvious trade partner. I advocate proposing a range of players that are available. Make sure to include those players who you think your trade partner might slightly overvalue. If he is interested, emphasize the positive stats of your Don Draper candidate. However, don’t seem eager. The best reaction to a trade proposal is a slow one. Take your time; be fair and vague, like how Don Draper picks up women.

Carlos Gonzalez – Carlos Gonzalez is the only baseball player my girlfriend knows (baby steps). So it pains me to speak ill of him, but I must…a tad. First, I’ll start with the praise: my god he can hit (.355 AVE, .367 OBP). Hopefully you see the problem there. A guy with a .355 AVE should have no problem posting an OBP around .400. Unfortunately, CarGo has walked just two times (compared to 15 Ks). For his major league career, he has walked 43 times and struck out 166 times. He has also been lucky when it comes to his BAbip (.407 in 2010 and .335 for his career). Anyway you look at it, his batting average and OBP are going to come down. That means his runs, RBIs and SBs will come with it. He’ll still be a good and useful player, just not at the heights he is at the moment. If people are buying his early season Ichiro impression, by all means sell.

Chase Headley – I liked Headley a few years ago. Now he is 26 and mashing for the new and improved San Diego Padres. He was a career .300 hitter in the minor leagues and I see no issue with him approaching that number in 2010 (of course his current average is .337). Still, his slight (and real) average decline isn’t why I advocate trading him at the moment. I am doing so because his value is inflated by six stolen bases. Headley stole six bases total in four minor league seasons. He only stole 10 last year. Quite frankly, I don’t see him stealing much more than six the rest of the way. If you can sell based on his SB potential, Don Draper would be smiling upon you.

Vlad Guerrero – Listen, Vlad is awesome, but he ain’t gonna hit .368 or steal three more bases all year (most of his 2010 steals came against the inept Red Sox). Right now, he is rated highly based on his average and those steals. If someone thinks those can continue, by all means sell. If not, enjoy keeping him, as he’ll score a decent amount of runs, hit 16-20 HRs and bat a comfortable .300.

John Danks – Danks has been off to an impressive start to the 2010 campaign: three wins, 1.55 ERA, 0.86 WHIP, 1.9 BB/9 and 8.1 K/9. Is he living up to his first round selection? Not quite, at least not yet. For one thing, Danks has been pretty lucky: to wit, a .224 BAbip. That is completely unsustainable – when it rises so will his ratios. In addition, Danks’ K/9 rate has been a very serviceable 7.1 throughout his career and his walk rate had been 3/9. In 2010, he has made some major improvements in those areas. I’m not saying he cant keep up his 2010 rates, I’m just stating that he never has before. Danks is likely on his way to his best season yet, but he’s had a little help. If anyone is buying him as a surefire ace, I have no qualms about letting that owner deal with the luck correction.

Francisco Liriano – There is no denying that Liriano has been great (0.93 ERA, 0.97 WHIP, 8.4 Ks/9). However, he has never been all that healthy and he has a .247 BAbip. This is all my way of suggesting I don’t think he is “back” to his 2006 form (nor do I think he ever will). If you can get someone to pay something akin to what he was worth a few years ago, go right ahead. I’d rather let them take on the risk.

The Ed Norton hold pat time (Keeping the Faith)

I don’t love Edward Norton because he’s an Orioles fan (although that doesn’t hurt). I love him because he is an awesome actor. The players in his group can’t be moved for fair market value and shouldn’t be dropped in any competitive league. They’ll likely rebound to near draft value so don’t sell low. Instead, if you see any of these guys available, you should be buying at a discount.

Javier Vazquez — Yankee fans have about as good a history with Javier Vazquez as I do with Armando Benitez. So far, Vazquez has posted a 9.00 ERA and 1.80 WHIP. He has 18 Ks in 20 IPs and, for the season, he has an 8.1 K/9 rate (exactly the same as his career mark); however he has a bloated walk rate (5.0 compared to 2.4 for his career). Add that to an unlucky BAbip of .345 and you can see why Vazquez has been underperforming. He’ll turn it around (not to 2009 NL levels), but will be a good high-K/WHIP pitcher. Someone like an AJ Burnett.

Rick PorcelloPorcello is off to a poor sophomore campaign (7.91 ERA, 2.02).  Still, he has managed a decent K-rate (6.1 for the year, up from 4.7 last year) and he has been horribly unlucky (.449 BAbip). I actually expect him to get better, so don’t drop or try to trade him at this lonesome valley.

Josh BeckettI like Beckett and think he is a serviceable pitcher, but not the ace a lot of people do. He certainly hasn’t started the season well: 7.22 ERA, 1.74 WHIP and a 6.3 K/9 rate. Still, like Porcello, he has been unlucky (.351 BAbip). I also think his K-rate will get closer to his career norm of 8.5. At this point, he doesn’t have a lot of trade value, so you better ride out the storm.

Gavin FloydThere are a couple reasons Gavin Floyd ended up keeping the faith. First, you can’t really trade someone who has an 8.38 ERA and 2.02 WHIP over 19.1 IPs. Second, he has been horrendously unlucky (.406 BAbip). Third, Floyd doesn’t pitch well early in the season (6.60 ERA/1.69 WHIP in March/April, 5.42 ERA/1.41 WHIP in May). The good news is that he gets dramatically better over the summer. In summation, you can’t get fair value for him now and he’ll be better than he has been, so you have to hold on.

Cole Hamels – Cole Hamels is posting his highest career K/9 rate (10.6 versus his average of 8.5). Unfortunately, he is giving up roughly one more homerun per nine than he has in his career and walking 0.9 more batters per nine innings. Basically, Hamels has all of sudden given up a lot more HRs than he historically has. For his career he has averaged 24 HRs per year, yet this season he is on pace for 40 or so. I don’t think he suddenly became a gopher hurler. Let him ride this mess out.

Alexei Ramirez – Think of Alexei Ramirez as the hitter version of Gavin Floyd. For his career, Ramirez is a .198 hitter in March/April. For the rest of the way he slams the ball. Once the calendar turns, be sure to keep an eye on Ramirez (who is owned in only 64 percent of Yahoo leagues), as history suggests he’ll heat up. It’s not like you can trade him for anything anyway, so you might as well keep the faith!

Julio Borbon – I never thought I would be relieved that a player was hitting .185, yet I am for Borbon as he was hitting just .100 eight games ago. What has been so criminal about his 2010 campaign is his average on balls in play (.226). Last year he had a .360 BAbip. In the minors he hit .310 across three seasons. In short, Borbon is good for at least a .275 average, which would in turn lead to a lot of SBs. He is already on a good SB pace, think how good it will get when he gets on base more often. I wouldn’t be selling for pennies on the dollar.

Stats as of 12:00 PM ET April 29.

FB101’s 411: Trade Wells, Guillen, Zito, Uggla and Penny. Subtly move: Carlos Gonzalez, Headley, Vlad, Danks and Liriano. Keep the Faith on Vazquez, Beckett, Pocello, Floyd, Hamels, Borbon and Alexei Ramirez.

h2h_Corner on Twitter

h2h Corner ~ Back to the Future, Next Week’s h2h Preview

This column will predict how awesome/bad your team can be during next week’s contest. It will prove invaluable for those of you about to set your lineups in weekly leagues. Continue reading

h2h Corner ~ Katy Perry All-Stars VI

Welcome to the latest installment of the weekly hot and cold fantasy trends update. Thinking about these trends, thankfully, reminds me of that infectious pop vixen, Katy Perry. “Hot N Cold” remains one of my favorite songs — I simply run faster when it is playing. Weird, I know, but I’m fast. Continue reading